In the first four Laws of Customer Retention, we defined a series of equations that describe customer retention and the major forces that influence it. A summary of these is detailed below to insure we are all on the same page:

The First Law of Customer Retention — Predicting the probability of whether or not a business will retain a single customer:


In the first two laws of customer retention, we focused on determining the probability of retaining a customer and the retention pulse of an experience to enable us to easily monitor its health. In the third law of customer retention, we explored the influence that retained customers have on the organic growth of new customers and a method to measure the level of its influence.

In the fourth law of customer retention, we will expand our focus to encompass the effects of a business’s cross-channel engagement messages on the level of retention seen inside a customer experience. Whether the effects…


In order to thread the power of social proof into your digital product, we need to consider who the most important influencers in your ecosystem are. In social psychology, this is called defining “the in-group”.

In 2010, Facebook deployed an “I voted” button showing how many users had voted as part of a campaign to encourage turnout in the U.S. Congressional election. Different versions of the button (or no button) were showed to 61 million people. The button’s call-to-action increased the total vote count by 340k votes. …


In The First Law of Customer Retention (previously published here), we defined retention and provided an equation which helps determine the probability of whether or not a customer will be retained. In The Second Law of Customer Retention (previously published here), we showed that customer retention is not a single moment in time, but rather constantly changing states triggered by the actions people take in response to digital and physical experiences over the course of their relationship with a business.

As a reminder, we learned in the Second Law that the final stage of The Customer Retention Lifecycle is a…


What are cryptocurrencies like Bitcoin and Litecoin? What is the difference between the cryptocurrencies and blockchain networks that businesses are developing that you read about in the news? As a product manager, how do you know when there is an opportunity to leverage these technologies to drive growth within your customer or employee experience and how do you make that come to life? These are three important questions we often get asked at Bottle Rocket, so we decided to provide our current best answer for anyone who is interested in reading.

Before you can start thinking about ways to incorporate…


In The First Law of Customer Retention (previously published here), we talked about how retention is a cornerstone to sustainable growth and a key driver of new organic customer growth within a business. We defined it as the volume of customers as a percentage of the total base who come back to an experience over time and continue to exert the effort and/or pay the cost to reach the value available in said experience.

Further, we provided an equation to determine whether or not a potential customer moving through a business’s customer experience will be retained based upon the ratio…


Retention is the cornerstone of sustainable growth and is the driver of new organic customer growth within an experience. It measures the volume of customers as a percentage of the total base who come back to an experience over time and continue to exert the effort and pay the cost to reach its value.

Whether or not a customer is retained depends on if they are getting more value than the effort and cost required to get there. If the effort and cost are higher than the value offered, the chances of retaining a customer are low. On the other…


One might think Product Growth is “Product Management”, “Growth Marketing” or “Product Led Growth”. It’s actually a bit of all three.

Product Growth is the blending of advertising, design, engineering, marketing and product management teams into a single vehicle that is driving towards a single destination. This vehicle enables these teams to work together to ensure the copy, art and code in the web, mobile and other mediums is setup to drive the highest number of valuable customer interactions for a business as possible.

In this world, a TV advertisement would be planned as part of an engagement campaign that…


It was the best of times; it was the worst of times…and these were just a few days apart.


It’s common that I find myself in a room asking a team who supports a web or mobile application, “How do you measure the success or failure of your digital product?” More often than not, I end up with a list of twenty or so “metrics” the collective group has either been tasked with driving or have learned from an article online. It’s incredible how much content there is on this subject.

What most of the teams don’t realize when I first ask this question is that I’m looking for the single most important metric that aligns to your business’…

Tim Duncan

Product Growth Lead at Bottle Rocket

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